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  • Market Commentary - February 2017

Market Comment  07/02/2017

Market Commentary - February 2017

During the three month period to the end of January, Sterling strengthened somewhat from its oversold position as it became clear that the government would have to put its Brexit plans to a vote in parliament.

During the period under review, both the FTSE All-Share index and the FTSE World Ex UK index returned 3.0% in sterling terms, although in local currency terms the FTSE World ex UK index returned 7.0%.

US equities performed strongly following Donald Trump’s Presidential election success as investors started to price in the effects of a significant hike in infrastructure spend, deregulation and the possibility of substantial declines in corporation tax. During the period under review the S&P500 index returned 4.6% in Sterling terms.

US equities performed strongly following Donald Trump’s Presidential election success as investors started to price in the effects of a significant hike in infrastructure spend, deregulation and the possibility of substantial declines in corporation tax.

Gilts produced a negative return as prices retraced from the highs stimulated by the Bank of England relaunch of quantitative easing and its bond buying program (FTSE Gilts All Stocks index, -1.3%). UK investment grade debt produced a flat return (BAML £ Corporate Securities index, 0.0%), whilst UK high yield corporate debt performed well (BAML £ HY index, 2.7%) as investors sought income further up the risk curve.

The Brent crude oil price rose 15.3% to $55.7/barrel during the three month period to the end of January. OPEC surprised the market by announcing that an agreement had been made to limit output and non-OPEC Russia agreed to cut production as well.

The gold price fell 5.2% to $1211/oz during the three month period.

Market Outlook

Investor reaction to Trump’s success in the US Presidential election has been remarkable. The US equity market (as well as the US Dollar) initially rose strongly as investors anticipate the success of a switch away from extraordinary monetary policy towards a more traditional fiscal stimulus via both tax cuts for corporates and individuals, deregulation and increased spending on infrastructure. Optimism abounds that such policies will be the panacea which will enable US (and thereby global) growth to rebound and economies to reflate.  Indeed, regional surveys of company management teams are beginning to suggest confidence that global economic growth will accelerate during 2017.

...regional surveys of company management teams are beginning to suggest confidence that global economic growth will accelerate during 2017.

We, at Cornelian, have been vocal for some time for the need for policymakers to switch from a playbook which meant any misstep in the economy was met with additional money printing (and bond buying) to that of fiscal stimulus. However, we fear that the gulf between what can be promised in speeches (and is being priced into markets) versus what can be delivered is growing and that at some stage during the year reality may set in and there is likely to be a reappraisal of what can be achieved by the Trump Presidency. Despite being relatively expensive, the US equity market is likely to continue to do well during the early days of the Trump administration but soon investors will be demanding policy detail and assessing the probability that the policies will be enacted; perhaps we are close to ‘Peak Trump’.

...we fear that ..at some stage during the year reality may set in and there is likely to be a reappraisal of what can be achieved by the Trump Presidency. 

One counterargument to current investor optimism is that in the real world, actions have consequences. Ripping up trade treaties and implementing targeted import tariffs (or their equivalent) will create significant trade tensions, let alone disruptions to existing supply chains. Such actions will also intensify inflationary pressures which are already building, given the tight US labour market. If taken to its logical conclusion, investors will start to price in considerably higher interest rates than currently expected, which could strengthen the US Dollar still further. This will reduce the US economy’s competitiveness and dampen some of the positive ramifications of Trump’s pro-growth policies. The 30 year mortgage rate has already responded, rising sharply. This, combined with a stronger US Dollar is tightening financial conditions in the US before any of Trump’s policies have been enacted.

If taken to its logical conclusion, investors will start to price in considerably higher interest rates than currently expected, which could strengthen the US Dollar still further.

The best case outcome is that the more sensible, growth-promoting Trump policies are enacted without much controversy (whilst his wilder policy platforms are quietly dropped) and that this manages to extend the US economic cycle by encouraging domestic investment, the repatriation cash held by corporates overseas, significant tax breaks for corporates and increased share buy backs.

In geopolitical terms, the new US regime appears to have a strong desire to drive a wedge between Russia and China, in order, perhaps, to try to isolate China. Any US import trade tariffs could have significantly negative consequences on the overly indebted Chinese economy and this, alongside a threat to rip up the ‘One China’ policy over Taiwan, may be used to try to pressurise China to bring North Korea ‘to heel’ and demilitarise the South China Sea. However, this might strengthen China’s resolve to fight back against the proposed tariffs/import tax policies of the new administration. The most obvious way of doing this would be for them to devalue their currency in a dramatic and one-off nature, to such an extent that Chinese economic competitiveness is once again achieved, despite the actions of the US Government. This could threaten another wave of global deflation. Unfortunately, in such a scenario whereby the Chinese economy starts to undershoot its economic growth projections, the authorities may well view external geopolitical tensions as worth playing up if it deflects the populace’s attentions from economic problems at home. Such an outcome would have negative consequences for emerging market assets.

Elsewhere, Theresa May has committed to trigger Article 50 the end of the first quarter of 2017. Nothing to date assuages our fear that the European Union will ensure that the UK is ejected unceremoniously from the European Union with no trade agreement in place in two years’ time. Given the poor state of the UK’s finances, let alone the unbalanced nature of the economy, this could have negative short term consequences to domestic consumption as imported inflation rises and high value jobs move out of the UK. Dutch elections in March are followed by French Presidential elections in May, whilst German State elections are held in the Autumn. All of these have the potential for generating more political uncertainty.

Theresa May has committed to trigger Article 50 the end of the first quarter of 2017. Nothing to date assuages our fear that the European Union will ensure that the UK is ejected unceremoniously from the European Union with no trade agreement in place in two years’ time.

With all the uncertainty evinced above, we believe that the pendulum which swings between investor greed and fear has moved into greed territory. Whilst there may be further to go  in the short term, it is only a matter of time before it changes direction and starts to swing back towards fear, not least because the ultimate consequence of reflation is higher debt prices for governments and corporates which are already accommodating significant debt levels, and this (rising finance costs) can in itself become an headwind to further equity market performance.

Given the risk of higher inflation going forward (which would put pressure on bond yields and, therefore, prices), we continue to remain underweight government bonds which mature a long time in the future as these would be most affected. We are relatively comfortable about the near term economic outlook and so prefer corporate debt (both investment grade and higher risk debt).

We are not yet prepared to cut our equity positions, despite markets having done so well (in Sterling terms) over the past year as we believe that news in short term could push equities higher. However we remain vigilant of numerous potential catalysts which could reverse this view.

Risk Warning

Issued and approved by Cornelian Asset Managers Limited (CAML). You should remember that the value of investments and the income derived therefrom may fall as well as rise and you may not get back the amount that you invest. Past performance is not a guide to future returns. This material is directed only at persons in the UK and is not an offer or invitation to buy or sell securities. Opinions expressed represent the views of CAML at the time of preparation. They are subject to change and should not be interpreted as investment advice. CAML and connected companies, clients, directors, employees and other associates, may have a position in any security, or related financial instrument, issued by a company or organisation mentioned in this document.

Hector Kilpatrick
Chief Investment Officer

Market Comment  01/09/2017

Market Commentary - September 2017

During the three months to the end of August, the Conservatives returned to government without an overall majority in parliament and political developments in the United States began to call into question whether President Trump would be able to enact some of his growth promoting policies.

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Market Comment  01/08/2017

Market Commentary - August 2017

During the three months to end July, Sterling strengthened against the US Dollar despite the conservatives returning to government in June without an overall majority in parliament. Sterling weakened materially against the Euro as economic data releases in the Eurozone region surprised positively.

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